How to Turn a Necktie into a Bowtie Tutorial

Last weekend, we took off to Atlanta for the weekend to spend some time with Dave’s family and watch one of his cousins get married.  We had a fantastic time watching all of the kiddos play together, and the wedding itself was magical {more on that later!}.

We don’t get to dress up as a family very often, so I ordered some stuff online so that our family would be nice and coordinated, like any southern family should be.  I got Millie a coral dress with arrows, and the boys matching coral neckties.  Jayna and I already had navy dresses that went with Mille’s dress too.  The only problem was, when Lincoln’s tie arrived, it was waaay too long.  Obviously meant for a real boy, not a toddler.

Luckily, I happen to be a problem solver.How to turn a necktie into a bow tie...a step by step tutorial with detailed pictures. #bowtie #DIY #tutorial #bowtiepatternHere’s how my “how to turn a necktie into a bowtie” tutorial.

The first thing I did was to rip out the stitches that held the velcro neck piece onto the tie, since it wasn’t tied traditionally {which I prefer for a child, anyway}.How to turn a necktie into a bow tie...a step by step tutorial with detailed pictures. #bowtie #DIY #tutorial #bowtiepatternThen, I ripped the seams that went along the entire length of the tie, and opened it up.  I left the seam that made the tie pointed at the end.   I stuck my finger into the point and folded it the opposite way, so you could see the seam, and the tie folded lengthwise in half.How to turn a necktie into a bow tie...a step by step tutorial with detailed pictures. #bowtie #DIY #tutorial #bowtiepatternSorry for the bad picture above, but I measure and cut four inches off the bottom of the tie, making it 3″X4″.How to turn a necktie into a bow tie...a step by step tutorial with detailed pictures. #bowtie #DIY #tutorial #bowtiepatternThen I turned it right-side out and ironed it flat.  Turning the raw edges under a little bit, I glued around the open area, so it was sealed all the way around.  I forgot to take a picture, but I used more of the fabric to cut a 4″x4.5″ piece of fabric, and a 3″X2″ piece.  I folded both of them length-wise and sewed them together, right sides together.  For the 4″X4.5″ piece, I did the same thing as the piece above and folded the two raw ends inside and then glued them together.  You could use fabric glue in a tube, or do what I did, and use fabric hot glue so it won’t wash out.  The small piece will be the middle of your bow tie, so the ends can stay raw.How to turn a necktie into a bow tie...a step by step tutorial with detailed pictures. #bowtie #DIY #tutorial #bowtiepatternSo I ended up with four separate pieces of double-sided rectangles.  The one on the top with the velcro was the original neck-piece from the tie that I bought. I stacked the middle-sized rectangle on top of the large rectangle and scrunched together in the middle.  How to turn a necktie into a bow tie...a step by step tutorial with detailed pictures. #bowtie #DIY #tutorial #bowtiepatternI threaded a needed and wrapped it tightly around the middle of the bow tie a couple of times before sewing through the fabric too.  Made it nice and secure, so the bow will never fall apart.How to turn a necktie into a bow tie...a step by step tutorial with detailed pictures. #bowtie #DIY #tutorial #bowtiepatternThen, sew the raw end of the smallest piece of fabric to the middle of the back of the bow tie.  I made sure to line it up…so that way when I wrapped it around the front, the other raw side ended up in the back, hidden.How to turn a necktie into a bow tie...a step by step tutorial with detailed pictures. #bowtie #DIY #tutorial #bowtiepatternThen I centered the bow tie onto the neck strap.  I put a couple of stitches down to secure the bow tie onto the strap and make sure it was on there straight.  Then I wrapped the smallest piece of fabric around both the bow tie and the neck strap,  and put a dab of hot fabric glue down to secure it.  How to turn a necktie into a bow tie...a step by step tutorial with detailed pictures. #bowtie #DIY #tutorial #bowtiepatternAnd to finish it off,  I top-stitched it to keep it secure.  The great thing about it is that because most of it is hidden, you don’t really need to worry about your stitches being perfectly straight.  You can even see where I messed up with the glue gun on the left part of the bow.  But it’s all on the bottom and the back, so it’s totally not noticeable once it’s on the kid!How to turn a necktie into a bow tie...a step by step tutorial with detailed pictures. #bowtie #DIY #tutorial #bowtiepatternAnd considering I had no idea what I was doing when I started this project, it still only took me about an hour, including taking the pictures for this bowtie tutorial.

How to turn a necktie into a bow tie...a step by step tutorial with detailed pictures. #bowtie #DIY #tutorial #bowtiepatternShe altered a too-big necktie to create this adorable bow-tie! Step by step tutorialShe altered a too-big necktie to create this adorable bow-tie! Step by step tutorialAnd as cute as this guy is in them…there will be many more bowties in our future!

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Upcycled Easter Eggs

I recently updated our spring decor with a fruitful trip to Goodwill.  I was pleasantly surprised by both their home decor selection, as well as their Easter basket stocking table.  I picked up some new Easter eggs to stock and hide for Easter morning, but there ended up being a lot more than I anticipated.  How to up cycle your Easter Eggs for use all Spring long!And last year, I was able to score a couple of cute little round wicker baskets from Pick Your Plum.  After adding a little bit of florist’s moss from Michael’s, I decided they looked like little bird nests.

But I don’t know of any birds that lay neon green and pink eggs, so I decided to make these tacky Easter eggs look a little more realistic.How to up cycle your Easter Eggs for use all Spring long!Materials:

cardboard box with sides {the eggs will roll!}
plastic eggs
Valspar Spray Primer for Plastic
Valspar Textured Spray Paint in Stone {what I ended up preferring}
or
Rust-Oleum Multicolored Textured Spray Paint
How to up cycle your Easter Eggs for use all Spring long!
First, I put the eggs in the cardboard box and spray painted them with the plastic primer.  This is a little easier said than done, as the eggs roll all over the place and it takes a little effort to get them covered.  But it doesn’t matter what it looks like, because the primer will get covered with the paint.  Be sure to let it dry completely….I waited 24 hours before moving on.

Then do the same thing with the textured spray paint.  Again, due to the shape, you’ll need to cover the eggs in a couple of steps, letting the paint dry in-between.  Be sure to cover the seams and the holes well, so they don’t show.

After they dry completely, they look just like eggs!  I’ve seen a couple of other people use a little bit of brown/gray/blue paint to splatter some speckles on too, but I opted to stay white.

How to up cycle your Easter Eggs for use all Spring long!And they were the perfect addition to my Spring mantle!How to up cycle your Easter Eggs for use all Spring long!

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Invisible Zipper Tutorial on a Knockoff Anthropologie Pillowcase

I splurged at Christmas time and bought a couple of new pillows from Decor Steals.  I love them, but they are so fluffy, storing them is going to be annoying.  So I decided to make a couple of pillow cases for them instead.  After perusing the web and pinterest.  I found a couple of DIY pillowcases with hearts that are perfect for Valentine’s Day and spring.

So the first one I decided to try to make was a knockoff of this Anthropologie Heart Pillow.  Seemed simple!  And thanks to my friend Amelia, who gave me a ton of fabric last week, I had a couple of red cloth napkins that were perfect {and half finished!} for the project.  For the hearts, I cut out various sizes from a canvas drop cloth that I used for a couple of other projects.An invisible zipper tutorial on a Knockoff Anthropologie Heart PillowI used a fabric marker to draw a heart about a quarter inch from the edge to sew along.  I kept the edges raw, and with time they will get more raggy and unraveled.  Then I pinned them on one of the red cloth napkins, keeping them away from the edges {which would be sewn into seams}.An invisible zipper tutorial on a Knockoff Anthropologie Heart PillowThen I carefully sewed along the blue fabric marked line.  And just that quick, the front of the pillowcase was finished.  Now to add the back of the case and the zipper.An invisible zipper tutorial on a Knockoff Anthropologie Heart PillowI looked up an invisible zipper tutorial, and was completely shocked at how easy it was!  I found this fantastic tutorial on Stop Staring and Start Sewing, so check out that blog for even better pictures and another version of this step-by-step invisible zipper tutorial.

The stuff {other than fabric and thread and pins and such} that you’ll need are:

-an invisible zipper {labeled as such at the fabric store} that is about 6-8 inches longer than the length of fabric that you are going to put the zipper on
-an Elmer’s glue stick {the one that starts purple but dries clear}
-a zipper foot for your sewing machine.

You’ll start off by ironing the fabric right next to the zipper as close to the zipper as you can…this will let you sew right next to the zipper.  Here is an awesome before and after picture of the zipper from the site I mentioned above.

Once your zipper is all ironed out, center it on the fabric where you are going to put it, and mark off where the end of the fabric is, and then about an inch and a half from the end of the fabric.  Keep in mind that I was using finished cloth napkins, so my seams are nice and finished….if you are just using fabric, your seams will be raw.An invisible zipper tutorial on a Knockoff Anthropologie Heart PillowThen, you will use the glue stick to glue on the zipper {with the Right side of the fabric facing up, turn the zipper upside down to glue it to the fabric}. An invisible zipper tutorial on a Knockoff Anthropologie Heart Pillow Once you have the zipper “glued” on, set it with the hot iron {no steam}….amazing how that glue stick will stay!An invisible zipper tutorial on a Knockoff Anthropologie Heart PillowDo the same to the second piece of fabric, making sure that all of your edges and corners line up for easy sewing.  Set the glued on zipper on this side as well, and you are ready to sew your zipper on!This is one of the best tutorials I've seen for an invisible zipper tutorial. Lots of photos and links to others' sites for even more help. Made zipper installation a breeze! Plus the knockoff Anthropologie heart pillow was so cute!Put the zipper foot on your sewing machine, and shift the needle accordingly so that it will sew as close to the zipper coils as possible.  Start on the zipper fabric where you marked the first line {the one that was about an inch and a half from the edge}, and be sure the back stitch a bit {but not all the way to the end of the fabric}.This is one of the best tutorials I've seen for an invisible zipper tutorial. Lots of photos and links to others' sites for even more help. Made zipper installation a breeze! Plus the knockoff Anthropologie heart pillow was so cute!Stitch across the length of the zipper fabric until just past the next line, then backstitch.  Put your two pieces of fabric together, right sides together and zip up the zipper about 2/3 of the way.  Make sure your fabric corners line up.  Move the “tail” of the zipper out of the way and then glue or pin the corners of the fabric together.  Starting at the end of the fabric, sew the two pieces of fabric together, stopping just past the place that you originally backstitched on the zipper.  Backstitch.  Do the same on the other end of the zipper as well.  An invisible zipper tutorial on a Knockoff Anthropologie Heart PillowWith crappy scissors, cut the “tails” of your zipper off, and then close the zipper all the way.  Flip your fabric Right side up and iron over the zipper to make it “disappear.”  Open your zipper again about half way.  Then put the two pieces Right sides together again and pin/glue together.  Sew your pieces together all the way around, be sure to backstitch, and maybe even double stitch for durability.This is one of the best tutorials I've seen for an invisible zipper tutorial. Lots of photos and links to others' sites for even more help. Made zipper installation a breeze! Plus the knockoff Anthropologie heart pillow was so cute!Turn your pillowcase right sides out {aren’t you glad you opened your zipper on that last step!?!?}, and you are done!  Slide your case over your favorite seasonal and/or dingy pillow for an instant living room update!This is one of the best tutorials I've seen for an invisible zipper tutorial. Lots of photos and links to others' sites for even more help. Made zipper installation a breeze! Plus the knockoff Anthropologie heart pillow was so cute!

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How to Create a PicMonkey Image for Chalkboard Art

I know I promised you this last week, but what can I say?  The holiday season has descended upon us and all bets are off on getting any work done!   So, as I stated last week, I just love the trend of Chalkboard art.  I’ll occasionally print it out and frame it, but I prefer the dusty look of actual chalk drawings…the problem is that I’m not nearly creative enough or have the fancy handwriting to just wing it.  Last week, I showed you how to transfer an image onto a chalkboard…..but what if you don’t have an image to transfer?

Make your own!  My favorite free editing and creating website is called PicMonkey.  I pay for the upgrade {which is totally worth it for me, who uses it daily}, but you can make tons of stuff with the free version as well.  So, today I’m going to walk you through how to create a festive image for chalkboard art.

First thing, go to www.picmonkey.com.

How to use PicMonkey to create an image for Chalkboard Art

Click on Design at the top, and then select 8×10 canvas to create on.

How to use PicMonkey to create an image for Chalkboard Art

On the left hand column, choose the Snowflake {or the very bottom image….it changes often}.  Then select Winterland as your theme.  Find Wreathery and select the wreath image that you like to use.  Keep in mind that you will be tracing most of the images and text that you choose, so keep it to simple and clean lines.  An editing box will come up, so change it to a black/white color scheme to go easy on your printer.  {Do this for each step}

How to use PicMonkey to create an image for Chalkboard Art

Then, staying in Winterland, click on Holly and pick your favorite.  Use the editing  box to erase the holly and then keep the berries, resizing as needed.  Reposition to the middle of the bottom of the wreath.How to use PicMonkey to create an image for Chalkboard Art

Next, on the left hand-side, click on the big Tt for text.  Choose NEXA RUST for your “child.”  The editing box that pops up will allow you to change the color and size…and you can drag the word to reposition.

How to use PicMonkey to create an image for Chalkboard Art

Do the same {be sure to click on “Add Text” to start new lettering, or else your “child” will just keep changing in font} for “unto us a…is born” in Meie Script.

Then Save as a jpg.  And you will be able to follow the directions in my How to Cheat at Chalkboard Art post by opening up your jpg in Word in order to print it out.  Super easy!

And if you get a chance to play more with PicMonkey, the Lipstick choice on the left is awesome…you can brighten your smile, give yourself a little “NipTuck” or smooth out your wrinkles.  Not that you need it….

Hope you enjoyed this tutorial….feel free to share on Facebook or Pinterest!  It’d make my day!

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How to Cheat at Chalkboard Art

I have this cute little set of chalkboards that I got off of Decor Steals last year.  They were just begging to have some amazing chalkboard art with some clever saying on them.  The only problem is that I have less than desirable handwriting, and am too much of a perfectionist to be any good at free-form chalk drawings.  Time to fake it.

Here’s how I did it…How to Cheat at Chalkboard Art- Make professional looking chalkboard art for your home First, you need to find a great free printable that you want for your chalkboard.  There are a million on Pinterest, but here’s a quick roundup of some really cute Winter Holiday Chalkboard Art from Crafty Wife.  You can print these images out to use in frames for a quick decor update for the holidays.  But, if you want it on a chalkboard instead, here’s what you need to know.

Just FYI, If the background of your image is black {like a chalkboard}, you will be using a lot of ink in your printer.  If you can, fade the image as much as possible to help with ink…but make sure you can still see the art and text through the back of the paper.  Better yet, try to find an image with a white background and dark lines.  Either way,  here’s how to transfer the image onto your chalkboard surface.

  Open up Word and load your image from the picture file icon.How to Cheat at Chalkboard Art- Make professional looking chalkboard art for your home Then you want to right click on the image and choose Format Image, then Layout.  Then click on the option to move the image in front of any text {even if you have none in your Word Document}.  Then click on OK and resize and move your picture as needed.How to Cheat at Chalkboard Art- Make professional looking chalkboard art for your home  Right click on your image and choose Format Picture.   Then from the list on the left hand side, choose 3-D Rotation and then make sure the top choice {“X”} says 180 degrees.  OK.  Now your image should be mirror image of the original.How to Cheat at Chalkboard Art- Make professional looking chalkboard art for your home My chalkboard was big enough that I needed my image to be more than 8X10, so  I spread it across two pages by copy and pasting another image onto the second page.  Line up the two images so that you can print and then tape them together to create your one big image.How to Cheat at Chalkboard Art- Make professional looking chalkboard art for your home Be sure that your chalkboard surface has been primed by coloring over the entire thing with chalk, then cleaning it off.  This will also get you a couple of really nice, fine tipped pieces of chalk.How to Cheat at Chalkboard Art- Make professional looking chalkboard art for your home Then, use chalk to trace over every line on your paper that you want on your chalk board.  Feel free to edit the designs to your liking.  For example, I left out the lines in the middle of the leaves in my image.How to Cheat at Chalkboard Art- Make professional looking chalkboard art for your home When your paper is covered in chalk, flip it over and position it onto your chalkboard.  If you’d like, tape it down so it doesn’t move.  Then, take a pencil and shade over all the areas that you know you used chalk on.  You want to push down a bit, since this is the part that is transferring the chalk to the board.How to Cheat at Chalkboard Art- Make professional looking chalkboard art for your home When you lift up the paper, a faint print of your image will be left.  How to Cheat at Chalkboard Art- Make professional looking chalkboard art for your home From here, you can either trace it in traditional chalk again to make it a big darker, or use liquid chalk markers to make it a little “cleaner” looking.  This time, I went for the real deal, and used chalk.How to Cheat at Chalkboard Art- Make professional looking chalkboard art for your home It’s the perfect holiday addition to my kitchen wall!How to Cheat at Chalkboard Art- Make professional looking chalkboard art for your home Stay tuned on Thursday, and I’ll show you how I made this exact print, and how you can make your own image using PicMonkey!

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DIY Nativity Blocks

Last year I got a Silhouette for Mother’s Day.  It was one of those big ticket items that I thought I just HAD to have as a crafter.  I mean, just look at Pinterest and you’ll see all of the different things you can use this machine to make.  One of the cutest project’s I’d seen was the DIY Nativity Blocks from Ginger Snap Crafts.  So I decided to use her project as an inspiration for my own.  I know it’s not Christmas season quite yet, but in case you want a jump on some new decor for next month, and and you can use the Thanksgiving time time off to do it!

DIY Nativity Blocks using the Silhouette Machine - Palmettos and Pigtails

Although the painting and drying did take some time, it was a super easy project to do, especially since I’m a Silhouette novice!  I bought the Nativity Silhouette package {Design #52103}, and moved the figures around on my sheets of vinyl until I was able to fit them all onto two sheets total.  After using the Silhouette to cut them out, I peeled the surrounding vinyl away from each figure and trimmed for size.

DIY Nativity Blocks using the Silhouette Machine - Palmettos and Pigtails

DIY Nativity Blocks using the Silhouette Machine - Palmettos and Pigtails

By doing this, I was able to see what size blocks I needed for each piece.  Dave used 1.5″ thick blocks of scrap wood and cut {and labeled} each one to size.  I painted the front of each block white and let them dry overnight.

DIY Nativity Blocks using the Silhouette Machine - Palmettos and Pigtails

Then I peeled off each piece of vinyl and placed it firmly on the wood.  Make sure you sand the wood down before painting and applying vinyl…I had some unwanted bumps because I didn’t do this.

DIY Nativity Blocks using the Silhouette Machine - Palmettos and Pigtails

Then, making sure your vinyl is sealed around the edges, paint over the white part with the color that you choose.  When you paint next to the vinyl, feel free to paint over the edges, but always use an outward motion…starting on the vinyl and painting out over the edge, to minimize bleeding under the vinyl.  Peel off the vinyl carefully while the paint is still wet.

DIY Nativity Blocks using the Silhouette Machine - Palmettos and Pigtails

As you can see above, there are imperfections in my wood, where I didn’t sand, and some bleeding on the lamb’s head.  Hey, this whole project was trial and error!  Learn from my mistakes!

DIY Nativity Blocks using the Silhouette Machine - Palmettos and Pigtails

I ended up having to do several coats of paint on the yellow pieces…I think I’d stick with the darker colors if possible.  Especially since the contrast isn’t even quite as good on the yellow.

DIY Nativity Blocks using the Silhouette Machine - Palmettos and Pigtails

I made the pieces various sizes, and the girls have enjoyed playing with them, and Lincoln especially loves stacking them.   I’m planning on adding a stable for a backdrop and sanding down my edges a bit to make the blocks a little more “worn” looking.

DIY Nativity Blocks using the Silhouette Machine - Palmettos and Pigtails

This Nativity Block Scene is the perfect addition to what has become the “holiday” console table!

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Linking up here this week!

DIY Felt Busy Book

Recently I traveled by plane up to New Jersey for my grandfather’s funeral. I opted to bring Lincoln with me to provide some comic relief and distraction. You heard me right…I chose to bring my 16 month old son on an airplane. Crazy, I know. But I was feeling pretty confident since we were flying at bedtime, and I had my sister, Loo, flying with us.

But. Lincoln had other plans….and none of them included sleeping on a smelly, cramped airplane. And as the prepared and crafty momma that I am….I was ready!   In classic Shara form, I decided the night before we flew, that Lincoln not only needed a new pair of appliqued pajamas and a new long-sleeved monogrammed shirt, but that he also would benefit from a felt busy book. So while my embroidery machine sewed away at his new clothes, I got to work on his felt busy book.

And once I kind of had in mind what pages I wanted to make….it only took me about an hour. {Have I mentioned how much I love my new embroidery machine….I can multitask while sewing!!}. I decided to make the book super simple, with just five 9″x7″ felt pages. I didn’t sketch out anything-just winged it.

Page 1 was a counting page. I traced my hand on some tan felt, labled the fingers with numbers and hot glued the palm and wrist to a 9X7 “page” of felt. He can peel the fingers down to help learn how to count.

The back of Page 1 and front of Page 2 was a road. I did sketch that a little with white chalk, to make sure my road stayed a similar width throughout, and to make sure it was the right size for my pages. I also cut some bushes, a house and some little felt cars out of scraps. The cars keep getting lost though, so I may end up adding a couple of “carports” by gluing 3 edges of a rectangle down….to keep the cars from falling out of the book. I made sure to make my road thick enough for matchbox cars though, since I always have one of those in my diaper bag too.

The back of Page 2 and front of Page 3 were a tree and a basket. I cut out 5 apples and 5 leaves for the tree. This was probably Lincoln’s favorite page. He loved putting the apples on, and taking the leaves off of the tree and stuffing them in the basket. I also added numbers and “targets” {the dots} for practice in 1 to 1 correspondence in a few months…the teacher in me sneaks out every so often!

The back of Page 3 and front of Page 4 were for Mr. Potato Head.  Lincoln loves pointing out body parts {including the belly button of the closest victim}.

So I used similar technique to when I made the giant felt board Mr. Potato Head a couple of years ago, and just made it smaller {and a little less precise}.  I folded everything in half before cutting to make the body parts even.  Using a permanent marker to outline the eyes and feet is a great way to create definition without making so many individual felt pieces.  I messed up on the mouth by making teeth….I should have stuck to how I originally did it {and true to the plastic guy} with just a horizontal line for the teeth.  He ended up a little creepy, huh?

The back of page 4 and all of Page 5 I ended up leaving blank.  I simply ran out of time and ideas at 11:30 at night.  But it ended up working out to my advantage, as I had bought some stickers for Lincoln to play with on the plane, and the empty felt pages were the perfect place to “stick” them.  And because the felt stuck to the stickers, he was easily able to pull them off and on by himself.  And as you know, there is nothing more satisfying to a one year old than doing something by himself!

Once I had all the pages done, I made the cover.  Which ended up being the most time consuming item of the whole project.  I measured a 9″x7″ “cover” and then slide my template over a few inches {more than I needed so I can add pages later if I want}, and measured a second 9″x7″ back cover.  I also cut out a strip to hold my book closed, and attached a piece of adhesive rough velcro to it {so it stuck instantly to the cover of the book to keep it closed}.

Then I punched holes in the tops and bottoms of all of my pages and in the “spine” of my cover.  I folded the spine over once {use chalk to make sure all of your holes line up}, so make it a little sturdier and to store the extra spine fabric {for when I have more time to add more pages…}.  Then I used a long piece of yarn to “sew” the spine and the pages together.  I wove it through and then doubled back to make sure everything was supported.  Then I tied a knot.  If I add more pages, I’ll have to get a new piece of longer thread and do that process over again.

Now, I’ve seen the felt busy book pages on Pinterest.  And maybe someday I’ll get some free time to make some immaculate, creative pages for my book.  But for now, I’m happy knowing that my little book kept my toddler happy on a plane!

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DIY Butterfly Costume {and some sneak peeks!}

We don’t believe in store-bought Halloween costumes around here.  I don’t have anything against them or the people who buy them, but we make our own.  My general rule is that the kids can’t be “whatever everybody else is going to be.”  For example, Elsa.   For three years in a row now, my girls have “wanted” to be Elsa.  I put that in quotes because they only actually voiced that opinion the first year, just for it to be shot down immediately.  Now they know not to even ask! I know, I know, Mean Mommy.

My reasoning is simple.  They have Elsa {and just about every other princess} dress up clothes.  And since I made Jayna her very own Elsa dress, they can even BOTH be Elsa at the same time!  Which means they pretend to be a mainstream princess about 300 days out of the year.  So on Halloween, we are just about anything but princesses.  I’m trying to raise creative, non conformist kids, I suppose!  Which also means they have already been introduced to Pinterest…which is where we found the inspiration for this year and last year’s Halloween costumes.  I’ll post complete pictures of their ensembles next week, but for now, here’s my tutorial on how to make your very own DIY Butterfly Costume out of felt and ribbon, for about $5.

DIY Butterfly Costume and Maleficent HornsYou’ll need:

2 yards of black felt
1 1/2yards of black ribbon
1/2  yard each of all of the colored felt you’ll use
piece of white chalk, glue gun, and scissors
optional sewing machine/black thread

DIY Butterfly Costume and Maleficent Horns

Fold your 2 yards of felt in half and have your kid lay partially on the folded edge.  Freehand sketch with the chalk the shape of your butterfly wing.  I also kind of traced around her body to the top of her thighs so I would know where the butterfly’s body would be.  It ended up being kind of an oval shape.

Then I cut out the fabric, still folded, so the wings would be identical.  I cut an extra “oval” out of the leftover black fabric for the butterfly body.  You can see it below.

DIY Butterfly Costume and Maleficent Horns

Then I cut out tear drop shapes from the colored felt, folding it in half before cutting each time so there end up being two identical pieces.  I arranged all of the pieces on the felt before hot glueing them down.

DIY Butterfly Costume and Maleficent Horns

 I glued all of the colored pieces on, and then flipped the wings over and had Jayna lay in the middle again.  I marked off where I needed the straps to fall on the top of her shoulders and down by her waist.  DIY Butterfly Costume and Maleficent Horns

Then I used black thread to sew on the ribbon straps, leaving the ends of the ribbon long enough to tie around her waist when she has the straps on.  This helps the wings stay flat against her back.

DIY Butterfly Costume and Maleficent Horns

I also marked where her hands fall on the wings and sewed on little loops for her to hold onto.

DIY Butterfly Costume and Maleficent Horns

The whole project took about an hour muddling through, and cost about $5 or so in felt {after coupons!}  I can’t wait to show you more completed pictures!

Millie chose to be Maleficent this year, and her costume also turned out awesome.  I made her a black and purple tutu dress, and a horned headband using some floral wire, crepe paper and electrical tape.

DIY Butterfly Costume and Maleficent Horns

I formed the wire into identical “S” shapes and used the electrical tape to secure them onto the headband.

DIY Butterfly Costume and Maleficent Horns

Then I wrapped crepe paper around the wire.

DIY Butterfly Costume and Maleficent Horns

The whole thing ended up being a bit heavy on Millie’s head, so I taped a piece of black elastic around the inside of the entire thing, leaving a few gaps between the elastic and the headband to make room for bobby pins if necessary.

DIY Butterfly Costume and Maleficent Horns

Millie wasn’t so sure about the headband at first, but once we got her tutu dress made, she loved the overall look!  Stay tuned next week to see the completed costumes, or follow me on instagram or Facebook to keep up with us trick or treating!

Happy Halloween!

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DIY Paper Pumpkins

I have a quick Fall decor tutorial for you today.  I always have scrapbook paper laying around, so I decided to use a few pieces up while making a few DIY paper pumpkins for my Fall console table.

DIY Paper Pumpkins- a kid friendly Fall craft

All you need is:

Strips of scrapbook paper {12 strips for small, 18 for medium and 24 strips for large}:
1″x12″ for large pumpkins, 3/4″x9″ for medium, and 1/2″x6″ for small

piece of green paper with leaf shapes cut out {one per pumpkin}
a tool that is sharp for poking holes in paper
thick wire {from beading section of craft store} cut into 12″ pieces {one per pumpkin}
scissors or wire cutters

DIY Paper Pumpkins- a kid friendly Fall craft

Take one of your strips of paper and poke a hole in in about half an inch from the end.  If you want, you can poke holes in all of your strips of paper at once….both ends.

DIY Paper Pumpkins- a kid friendly Fall craft

Take one strip of paper and stick one end of your piece of wire through the hole, around the end and through the hole again, twisting it against the patterned side of the paper.  This will be the very bottom of your pumpkin.  Smoosh the wire down as flat as you can so the pumpkin will end up sitting flat.

DIY Paper Pumpkins- a kid friendly Fall craft

DIY Paper Pumpkins- a kid friendly Fall craft

After your wire s secured, string the rest of your paper strips onto the wire.

DIY Paper Pumpkins- a kid friendly Fall craft

Then, lace the wire through all of the other holes in the paper, starting with the non-patterned side.  Pull the wire taught, and slide all of the papers toward the “bottom” of the pumpkin {where you “smooched” the end of your wire}.  The papers should naturally form a curve, with the patterned part of the paper on the outside, and the wire on the inside of the curve.

DIY Paper Pumpkins- a kid friendly Fall craft

Loop the loose end of the wire {at the top of your pumpkin} around the end of the very top strip of paper, to secure the wire and keep the curve of your pumpkin.  I looped mine around the end of the paper and back through the hole, then twisted the ends of the wire to secure.   Then, I poked a hole in one of my leaves and laced the wire through it the same way, securing it down.

DIY Paper Pumpkins- a kid friendly Fall craft

Then I laced the end of the wire through the wire that was wrapped around the end of the leaf, pulling it through halfway.  Twist it once to secure, then loop the end of the wire through that part again, this time NOT pulling it through at all, just securing it.  Now you should have two secure loops sticking out from your leaf.  If you only have enough wire left to do one loop, that’s fine too.

DIY Paper Pumpkins- a kid friendly Fall craft

Cut the ends of each loop, creating four single wires that are emerging from your leaf.  Use a pencil and wrap the wire around tightly to create spirals.  Slowly slide the pencil out.

DIY Paper Pumpkins- a kid friendly Fall craft

DIY Paper Pumpkins- a kid friendly Fall craft

Spread your paper strips out evenly around the wire to create your pumpkin.  If your pumpkin is too round, and you prefer it a bit fatter, spread your paper strips aside so you can get to the wire in the middle. Pinch the wire between your thumb and pointer finger and twist as many times as needed to shorten the wire, which will make your pumpkin more squatty and fat.

DIY Paper Pumpkins- a kid friendly Fall craft

You’ll see in my photos that I used all 1″ strips {12 total} for each pumpkin, no matter what size pumpkin I was making.  The orange one {medium size} ended up not having enough strips of paper.  The yellow one {small} had enough strips, but they were a little too wide.   That’s why I gave you the measurements listed above in the materials list. I finally wised up and made the black pumpkin with 24 strips {alternating between two different black designs}….and that one ended up being my favorite!

DIY Paper Pumpkins- a kid friendly Fall craft

As you can see, this project is pretty easy and hard to mess up.  It’s easy to experiment with too, so if you come up with any other ideas or hints, please share!

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I’m sharing over at these linky parties this week!

DIY Burlap Wreath

If there is one fabric that could sum up Fall for me, it’s burlap.  I love how versatile it is: being used for pillow cases, table runners and wreaths.  It’s rustic feel and earthy smell just scream Fall.  So I thought I’d take advantage of the Fall decor sale at Hobby Lobby and  buy some supplies to make a new DIY burlap wreath for my front door.  The whole thing cost me $12, and was so easy to make that Jayna {my 6 year old} made a second one for my grandma!DIY Burlap Wreath-so easy my 6 year old made one too!What You’ll Need:

a wire wreath form
several rolls of burlap
a roll of colored burlap for the bow
a wooden letter
white paint
floral wire
DIY Burlap Wreath MaterialsYou’ll notice that there are 4 wires in the frame, separating the frame into three different sections.  I’m going to call them “inner,” “middle,” and “outer.”  Start in the “inner” section and tie a knot in the burlap around the innermost wire…it will be hidden, so it’s ok if it’s messy.Step by Step Tutorial on how to make your own DIY Burlap Wreath and BowThen, you will push a little of the burlap {the part right next to the knot} through the “inner” section, creating kind of a loop….don’t pull it all the way through.Step by Step Tutorial on how to make your own DIY Burlap Wreath and BowHolding the loop in place, take a hold of the long piece of burlap and twist it up against the wire, securing the first loop in place.  Then, push a second loop through the “middle” section, and twist.  Continue with a third loop through the “outer” section, and twist.  The fourth loop will be through the “middle” section again.  Keep alternating the loops through the different sections and twisting once in between each loop.  You’ll quickly see how easy it is, and how you can kind of manipulate the loops and twists to create your wreath.Step by Step Tutorial on how to make your own DIY Burlap Wreath and BowIf you run out of burlap…get another roll, tie it off and start again.  The back will be a bit messy, but it won’t show.  When you’ve made it all the way around, lace the end of the rest of the burlap around the wire a couple of times to secure it.  Then, twist the tail and loop it back around and tuck it back through the wire.  Make sure your loop is big enough to hang on a hook or a door hanger.I tied it to the wire, and then just tucked the leftover burlap throughout the back of the wreath, weaving it through the wire as needed.Step by Step Tutorial on how to make your own DIY Burlap Wreath and Bow

 The next steps are easy.  Just paint your wooden letter, and wrap floral wire around a couple of parts of it.  Leave the wire long enough that you will be able to wrap it around the wreath, creating a temporary decoration for your wreath.  Then you can switch it out for different seasons and occasions. I used green floral wire, so I just painted over it with my white paint.Step by Step Tutorial on how to make your own DIY Burlap Wreath and Bow

For the bow, use your colored burlap and drape about 2 feet over your arm {1}.  Grab ahold of it wherever you want your knot to be {2}.  Pull the back tail of the fabric over your fist and wrist {3}.  Turn your hand to the side, and bring the back piece of fabric {the one you draped over your wrist} under your hand and tuck it through the piece of fabric covering your wrist {4}, creating your second loop.  Pull it through the knot enough that you can easily slide your hand out of the knot {5}.  Then  work the fabric to make the loops the same size, and to make your knot how you’d like it to look {6}.

Step by Step Tutorial on how to make your own DIY Burlap Wreath and BowWeave another piece of floral wire through the back of your bow and secure it to your wreath.  Then you can make other bows in other colors to change up the look of your wreath.Step by Step Tutorial on how to make your own DIY Burlap Wreath and BowI love how the “R” pops against the color of the wreath and the door!Step by Step Tutorial on how to make your own DIY Burlap Wreath and Bow

The perfect DIY Burlap Wreath for Fall!
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